For Parents

The Page is divided in 5 segments –
1. FAQs for Parents
2. What to do if a child is suspected to have LD
3. Myths & Facts
4. Remediation
5. Links for provisions by CBSE/NIOS

1. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS BY PARENTS

1. Why only my child is struggling in school?
Each and every child is different and learns on his/ her learning pace. It is evident from the observations that your child is finding school challenging but we need to find out why is this happening these issues which are bothering his/her learning can be environmental or genetically acquired. Once it is ruled out with the help of assessment these issues can be managed with right intervention. There’s no one who’s chosen for these but can happen to any child.

2. What is Special Education?
Specially designed instructions to meet the unique needs of a child who cannot benefit from traditional methods of teaching. These difficulties faced by a child can be acquired or environmental. These programs are multisensory and proceed at child’s pace. These programs are formulated after identifying the learning style and strengths of the child along with that work is done the on development of skills.

3. Why is this program expensive?
Special education or remedial teaching has individualized or tailor made education programs which are one- to- one sessions based. These programs are designed to meet the unique education needs of the child as they are made according to the learners learning style which involves usage of multisensory tools and books of various skills which are different from regular books. Remediation teaching helps the child in developing skills which is required by him/her in studies. It also involve other professionals like speech therapist, occupational therapist, psychologist, special educator and class teacher. Please have a positive attitude and don’t teat as an extra expenditure but an investment in your child’s development.

4. How do we (parents) get to know what is happening in these sessions?
Our policies and way of work is very transparent. As a part of IEP, we make and review our monthly goals which are decided according to the skills which we need to develop in the child. This document has all the areas on which special educators along with other professionals are working on. We have no APPREHENSIONS in sharing them with parents. We also give a half yearly appraisals which mentions all areas of improvement, areas which require further remediation.

5. How much time do you think my child needs to overcome these issues?
See as I said the issues can be managed to a certain extend with interventions. How long it will take depends upon the severity of the issues and child’s response to strategies given. Once the skills are developed the child can manage to study independently but how long that takes to fill up the gaps again depends upon the child however you will see traces of improvements gradually.

2. IF I SUSPECT THAT THE STUDENT HAS LD …

Refer the student to an educational clinic, learning center or to a qualified practitioner for a complete evaluation.

A diagnosis should be based on:
• A history of school performance and family background
• A physical checkup to eliminate eyesight, hearing or neurological deficits
• An ability (usually an IQ test) Oral and written, expressive and receptive language development tests
• An academic assessment of oral reading, vocabulary, handwriting and composition.
This evaluation should be followed by a full written report detailing the areas of difficulty and a recommendation of an appropriate education plan.

3. MYTHS AND FACTS

Dyslexia Myth 1: Dyslexia is a visual problem.
The facts: The bulk of research now suggests that reading disabilities stem from difficulties with language rather than vision. Researchers think dyslexic children have trouble identifying phonemes-the tiny sounds that make up words, such as the “c” sound in “cat” However, vision problems can definitely contribute to learning problems. The child with tracking problems will lose his place. The child with eye teaming problems will periodically see double. These symptoms, and others, can contribute to being unable to stay on task.

Dyslexia Myth 2: More boys than girls are dyslexic.
The facts: As many girls as boys suffer from reading disabilities, according to studies conducted at Yale University. Reading problems relating to girls, however, often go undetected.

Dyslexia Myth 3: Dyslexia is a sort of retardation.
The facts: Dyslexia is a difficulty in learning to read, write and spell, despite traditional teaching, average intelligence, and an adequate opportunity to learn. It is impairment in the brain’s ability to translate information received from the eyes or ears into understandable language. It does not result from vision or hearing problems. It is not due to mental retardation, brain damage, or lack of intelligence.

Dyslexia Myth 4: There is no ‘cure’ for dyslexia.
The facts: Dyslexia is not a disease. Given the appropriate specialized teaching, dyslexics can learn to read (and even to spell) just as well as anyone else.

Dyslexia Myth 5: My child can’t be dyslexic. No one else in the family has it.
The facts: Beware. In some families, one, or both parents, are obviously dyslexic and all, or most, of their children, have the difficulties. In other families, dyslexia is not apparent in either parent and the other children are unaffected.

Dyslexia Myth 6: Dyslexics are “gifted/stupid”.
The facts: Repeated studies have shown that there is little relationship between dyslexia and intelligence in young children. Dyslexia occurs across a whole spectrum of intelligence and is likely to be found in the gifted and talented population as well as in the low-ability but most of them fall in the middle. However, if dyslexics don’t learn to read, their IQs tend to fall as they get older.

Dyslexia Myth 7: Reversing letters is a good indication of dyslexia.
The facts: In fact, writing backwards and reversal of letters and words are common among young children learning to write whether or not they are dyslexic. Only about 10% of dyslexics reverse letters. In general, letter-reversals become an area of concern if it persists beyond Primary 2 or 8 years old.

Dyslexia Myth 8: Dyslexics can’t read.
The facts: People with mild to moderate dyslexia have usually learnt to read well enough to ‘get by’ and to avoid being noticed. Despite this, their reading usually remains slower than normal and a spelling skills check will often reveal their true difficulties.

Dyslexia Myth 9: He can’t have dyslexia because he can read.
The facts: All children with dyslexia can read—up to a point. But the problem they have with processing speech sounds, prevent them from hearing all the individual sounds in a word. Therefore, they generally don’t read by sounding out. With poor ability to detect and manipulate speech sounds, dyslexics tend to have inadequate knowledge and application of how sounds are linked with their written form. This weak letter-sound link affects their ability to read to some extent. Instead, they often use alternative strategies like pictures, a familiar story, the shapes of words, and guessing based on the first letter or two. But their memories can hold only a limited number of words. So these strategies will fail them by the third or fourth grade. Without the right type of help, they cannot progress any further—no matter how smart they are or how hard they try.

Dyslexia Myth10: Learning problems are not that common.
The facts: Research has shown that approximately10-12% of the population could have a learning disability. This means, in a class of 40, there could be 4-5 children with this condition.

Dyslexia Myth 11: Dyslexia means you see things backwards.
The facts: If it were that simple, we could solve the problem by having dyslexic children hold their books in front of a mirror. Research has proven that people with dyslexia do NOT see things backwards.

Dyslexia Myth 12: Repeating a grade in school can remove dyslexia.
The facts: Dyslexics learn in a different way. Specialized teaching is necessary to learn to overcome dyslexia and cope with mainstream school.

Dyslexia Myth 13: All Dyslexics also have ADD/ADHD.
The facts: ADD/ADHD is an associated condition to learning disabilities. Research suggests that 40% of the children with learning disabilities could have attention issues.

Dyslexia Myth 14: Dyslexics will not succeed in life.
The facts: A great majority of dyslexics have succeeded in their respective spheres of life. Some famous and accomplished dyslexics include Albert Einstein, MM Lee Kuan Yew, Richard Branson and Tom Cruise, to name a few.

4. REMEDIATION

WHAT IS REMEDIATION?
Remedial programs are programs designed to address specific weaknesses for individuals who aren’t achieving up to grade level expectations. Remedial programs take place outside the regular or general classroom and are typically tailored to meet individual needs. Remedial programs can also take place in clinics or in private centers.
Remedial programs are indicated on an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Remediation of skills through intensive instruction and practice occurs in remedial programs.
In remedial teaching it is important to consider certain ecological factors affecting the students’ learning or the interactions between an individual and the various environments within which the person lives. A student’s ecological system include – the environment at home, school, social group, cultural factors which influence the desire and ability to learn. A complex relationship exists between the student and these environments. Also each of the environments interacts with each other and influence the student’s learning and adds to the student’s complex ecological systems.

PROCESS OF REMEDIATION AT ORKIDS

First meeting / informal assessment
The first meeting is ONLY with the parents as we do not want the child to be privy to the conversation relating to his/her weaknesses. Each child undergoes an informal assessment irrespective of any previously done assessments which then serves as a baseline to start the remediation.

Making IEP (individual educational plan)
Each child has an IEP which states the short term (3 months) & long term (6 months) goals. Besides this, each child also has a monthly goal sheet which is evaluated at the end of the month. These goal sheets can be shared with the school if required. Finally, each special educator/ subject specialist plans for each and every child on a daily basis. All the planning is supervised minutely by the clinic head.

Remediation commencement
The clinics function 6 days a week for 3 hours a day. The children come in as per their days which could range from once a week to six times a week. This decision is taken on the basis of –
1. Severity of the condition.
2. Parental consent to bring the child.

But the final decision makers are the parents. However, we do suggest parents to send their child for at least thrice a week for improvement to be seen within 4 to 6 weeks. The sessions are one-to-one unless the goal is group interaction. Children requiring speech & language therapy / occupational therapy inputs are slotted over and above the special education slots.

Appraisal report
Each child’s appraisal report is prepared every six months. This report is given to the parents and can be shared with the child’s school.

5. PROVISION BY CBSE
Click on this link to get the latest information.
PROVISION BY NIOS
Click on this link to get the latest information.
<!–
The Page is divided in 5 segments :
FAQs for Parents, Symptoms, Myths & Facts, Remediation and Provisions by CBSE/NIOS

Frequently asked questions by parents:

1. Why only my child is struggling in school?

Each and every child is different and learns on his/ her learning pace. It is evident from the observations that your child is finding school challanging but we need to find out why is this happening these issues which are bothering his/her learning can be environmental or genetically acquired. Once it is ruled out with the help of assessment these issues can be managed with right intervention. There’s no one who’s chosen for these but can happen to any child.

2. What is Special Education?

Specially designed instructions to meet the unique needs of a child who cannot benefit from traditional methods of teaching. These difficulties faced by a child can be acquired or environmental.These programs are multisensory and proceed at child’s pace. These programs are formulated after identifying the learning style and strengths of the child along with that work is done the on development of skills.

3. Why is this program expensive?

Special education or remedial teaching has individualised or tailor made education programs which are one- to- one sessions based. These programs are designed to meet the unique education needs of the child as they are made according to the learners learning style which involves usage of multisensory tools and books of various skills which are different from regular books. Remediatial teaching helps the child in developing skills which is required by him/her in studies. It also involve other professionals like speech therapist, occupational therapist, psychologist, special educator and class teacher. Please have a positive attitude and don’t teat as an extra expenditure but an investment in your child’s development.

4. How do we (parents) get to know what is happening in these sessions?

Our policies and way of work is very transparent. As apart of IEP we make and review our monthly goals which are diceded according to the skills which we need to develop in the child. This document has all the areas on which special educators along with other professionals are working on. We have no APPREHENSIONS in sharing them with parents. We also give a half yearly appraisals which mentions all areas of improvement, areas which require further remediation.

5. How much time do you think my child needs to overcome these issues?

See as I said the issues can be managed to a certain extend with interventions. How long it will take depends upon the severity of the issues and child’s response to strategies given. Once the skills are developed the child can manage to study independently but how long that takes to fill up the gaps again depends upon the child however you will see traces of improvements gradually.


If I suspect that the student has LD …

Refer the student to an educational clinic , learning center or to a qualified practitioner for a complete evaluation.

A diagnosis should be based on :

• A history of school performance and family background
• A physical checkup to eliminate eyesight , hearing or neurological deficits
• An ability ( usually an IQ test ) Oral and written , expressive and receptive language development tests
• An academic assessment of oral reading, vocabulary, handwriting and composition.

This evaluation should be followed by a full written report detailing the areas of difficulty and a recommendation of an appropriate education plan.


MYTHS AND FACTS

Dyslexia Myth 1: Dyslexia is a visual problem.
The facts: The bulk of research now suggests that reading disabilities stem from difficulties with language rather than vision. Researchers think dyslexic children have trouble identifying phonemes-the tiny sounds that make up words, such as the “c” sound in “cat” However, vision problems can definitely contribute to learning problems. The child with tracking problems will lose his place. The child with eye teaming problems will periodically see double. These symptoms, and others, can contribute to being unable to stay on task.

Dyslexia Myth 2: More boys than girls are dyslexic.
The facts: As many girls as boys suffer from reading disabilities, according to studies conducted at Yale University. Reading problems relating to girls, however, often go undetected.

Dyslexia Myth 3: Dyslexia is a sort of retardation.
The facts: Dyslexia is a difficulty in learning to read, write and spell, despite traditional teaching, average intelligence, and an adequate opportunity to learn. It is an impairment in the brain’s ability to translate information received from the eyes or ears into understandable language. It does not result from vision or hearing problems. It is not due to mental retardation, brain damage, or lack of intelligence.

Dyslexia Myth 4: There is no ‘cure’ for dyslexia.
The facts: Dyslexia is not a disease. Given the appropriate specialized teaching, dyslexics can learn to read (and even to spell) just as well as anyone else.

Dyslexia Myth 5: My child can’t be dyslexic. No one else in the family has it.
The facts: : Beware. In some families, one, or both parents, are obviously dyslexic and all, or most, of their children, have the difficulties. In other families, dyslexia is not apparent in either parent and the other children are unaffected.

Dyslexia Myth 6: Dyslexics are “gifted/stupid”.
The facts: : Repeated studies have shown that there is little relationship between dyslexia and intelligence in young children. Dyslexia occurs across a whole spectrum of intelligence and is likely to be found in the gifted and talented population as well as in the low-ability but most of them fall in the middle. However, if dyslexics don’t learn to read, their IQs tend to fall as they get older.

Dyslexia Myth 7: Reversing letters is a good indication of dyslexia.
The facts: In fact, writing backwards and reversal of letters and words are common among young children learning to write whether or not they are dyslexic. Only about 10% of dyslexics reverse letters. In general, letter-reversals become an area of concern if it persists beyond Primary 2 or 8 years old.

Dyslexia Myth 8: Dyslexics can’t read.
The facts: : People with mild to moderate dyslexia have usually learnt to read well enough to ‘get by’ and to avoid being noticed. Despite this, their reading usually remains slower than normal and a spelling skills check will often reveal their true difficulties.

Dyslexia Myth 9: He can’t have dyslexia because he can read.
The facts: : All children with dyslexia can read—up to a point. But the problem they have with processing speech sounds, prevent them from hearing all the individual sounds in a word. Therefore, they generally don’t read by sounding out. With poor ability to detect and manipulate speech sounds, dyslexics tend to have inadequate knowledge and application of how sounds are linked with their written form. This weak letter-sound link affects their ability to read to some extent. Instead, they often use alternative strategies like pictures, a familiar story, the shapes of words, and guessing based on the first letter or two. But their memories can hold only a limited number of words. So these strategies will fail them by the third or fourth grade. Without the right type of help, they cannot progress any further—no matter how smart they are or how hard they try.

Dyslexia Myth10: Learning problems are not that common.
The facts: Research has shown that approximately10-12% of the population could have a learning disability. This means, in a class of 40, there could be 4-5 children with this condition.

Dyslexia Myth 11: Dyslexia means you see things backwards.
The facts: If it were that simple, we could solve the problem by having dyslexic children hold their books in front of a mirror. Research has proven that people with dyslexia do NOT see things backwards.

Dyslexia Myth 12: Repeating a grade in school can remove dyslexia.
The facts: Dyslexics learn in a different way. Specialised teaching is necessary to learn to overcome dyslexia and cope with mainstream school.

Dyslexia Myth 13: All Dyslexics also have ADD/ADHD.
The facts: ADD/ADHD is an associated condition to learning disabilities. Research suggests that 40% of the children with learning disabilities could have attention issues.

Dyslexia Myth 14: Dyslexics will not succeed in life.
The facts: A great majority of dyslexics have succeeded in their respective spheres of life. Some famous and accomplished dyslexics include Albert Einstein, MM Lee Kuan Yew, Richard Branson and Tom Cruise, to name a few.


REMEDIATION

WHAT IS REMEDIATION ?

Remedial programs are programs designed to address specific weaknesses for individuals who aren’t achieving up to grade level expectations . Remedial programs take place outside the regular or general classroom and are typically tailored to meet individual needs. Remedial programs can also take place in clinics or in private centers.

Remedial programs are indicated on an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Remediation of skills through intensive instruction and practice occurs in remedial programs.

In remedial teaching it is important to consider certain ecological factors affecting the students’ learning or the interactions between an individual and the various environments within which the person lives . A student’s ecological system include – the environment at home , school , social group , cultural factors which influence the desire and ability to learn. A complex relationship exists between the student and these environments . Also each of the environment interact with each other and influence the student’s learning and add to the student’s complex ecological systems.

PROCESS OF REMEDIATION AT ORKIDS

FIRST MEETING / INFORMAL ASSESSMENT
The first meeting is ONLY with the parents as we do not want the child to be privy to the conversation relating to his/her weaknesses. Each child undergoes an informal assessment irrespective of any previously done assessments which then serves as a baseline to start the remediation.

MAKING IEP (INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONAL PLAN)
Each child has an IEP which states the short term (3 months) & long term (6 months) goals. Besides this, each child also has a monthly goal sheet which is evaluated at the end of the month. These goal sheets can be shared with the school if required. Finally, each special educator/ subject specialist plans for each and every child on a daily basis. All the planning is supervised minutely by the clinic head.

REMEDIATION COMMENCEMENT
The clinics function 6 days a week for 3 hours a day. The children come in as per their days which could range from once a week to six times a week. This decision is taken on the basis of

1. Severity of the condition.
2. Parental consent to bring the child.

But the final decision makers are the parents. However, we do suggest parents to send their child for at least thrice a week for improvement to be seen within 4 to 6 weeks. The sessions are one-to-one unless the goal is group interaction. Children requiring speech & language therapy / occupational therapy inputs are slotted over and above the special education slots.

APPRAISAL REPORT
Each child’s appraisal report is prepared every six months. This report is given to the parents and can be shared with the child’s school.


PROVISION BY CBSE,NIOS

Provision by CBSE

Relaxations for Disabled Children

The facilities extended by the CBSE Board to the disabled candidates (Dyslexic, Blind, Spastic and Candidate with Visual Impairment) are as under:-

1. The persons with disabilities (Dyslexic, Blind, Spastic and Candidate with Visual Impairment) have the option of studying one compulsory language as against two. The language opted by them should be in consonance with the overall spirit of the Three Language Formula prescribed by the Board. Besides one language they can offer any four of the following subjects:
Mathematics, Science and Technology, Social Science, Another Language, Music, Painting, Home Science and Introductory Information Technology.

2. From the 2002 Examination, alternate questions in lieu of questions requiring special skills based on visual inputs have been provided in Mathematics and Science for Sec. School Examination (Class X).

3. Blind, Physically Handicapped and Dyslexic Students are permitted to use and amanuensis. The amanuensis must be a student of a class lower than the one for which the candidate is taking the examination.

4. The visually handicapped students appearing from Delhi were provided Questions Papers with enlarged print for 2003 Examination;.

5. Disabled candidates are allowed additional one hour (60 minutes ) for each paper of external examination.

6. Board does not give relaxation in minimum marks prescribed by it.

7. Exemption from Examination in the Third Language.

8. The Board considers the Physiotherapic exercises as equivalent to Physical and Health Education course of the Board.

9. Centre Superintendents have been instructed to make arrangements for the conduct of the examination of such candidates on the Ground Floor as far as possible.

10. Physically challenged children will specifically indicate their category and also state whether they have been provided with a Writer in the columns provided in the Main Answer Book.

11. Answer books of such candidates are evaluated by the Regional Officers at one Nodal Centre.

12. The Centre Superintendents have been requested to send the Answer books of such candidates in the separate envelope to the Regional Officer concerned.

13. Separate question papers in Science & Mathematics at Secondary ( Class X) level have been provided for blind students w.e.f. 2003 Examinations.

14. Assistant Superintendents for the blinds are teachers from the schools where the blinds are studying. As far as possible, teachers of the same subject are not allowed to be appointed on the day of examination. One invigilator is from outside the school.

15. Assistant Superintendents supervising the physically challenged children who have been granted 60 minutes extra time are paid remuneration @ Rs. 50/-+ Rs. 20/

16. Amanuensis are paid @ Rs. 100/- per day/paper daily by the Centre Superintendent from the center.

PROVISION BY CBSE,NIOS

Provision by NIOS

STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURE FOR GENERAL AND SPECIFIC
RELAXATIONS (DISABILITY WISE) DURING NIOS EXAMINATIONS

National Institute of Open Schooling
Cell for the Education of Disabled
A-31, Sector 62, NOIDA 201301

1. Introduction

Persons with disability need special attention during the examinations and evaluation of their answer scripts.

The general relaxations with regard to examination are as follows:

1. A candidate who wishes to avail the concession in Examination is required to produce a Medical Disability Certificate of a Govt. doctor from a recognized Hospital/Medical Institution indicating the nature of his/her disability and the extent of the disability.

2. In case of candidate with Learning Disability (LD), Diagnostic Certificate from the Clinical Psychologist, Educational or school Psychologist, Neuro psychologist, Specialist in Learning Disabilities, Special Educator (MEd.) Educational Therapist are acceptable. The Diagnostician should have appropriate qualification to provide a diagnosis of learning disabilities and must be registered with Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI)/Medical Council of India (MCI) or National Institutes and Universities dealing with disabilities, or Cell for the Education of Disabled (CED) of NIOS.

3. While appearing at the examinations, the candidate will write his/her disability on the top of the answer script, which will also be authenticated by the Centre Superintendent.

4. Such candidates will be provided general relaxations and also the facility of amanuensis according to their disabilities.

5. Incase of candidates using services of scribe/ amanuensis, not more than two scribes/amanuensis should be allowed in one examination room.

6. The Centre Superintendent will make arrangements to seat a maximum of four candidates in a separate room with a separate invigilator for supervision.

2. Guidelines for the Provision of Amanuensis/Scribe/Writer

Amanuensis/Scribe/writer can be provided

1. In case of candidates with Visual Impairment, Learning Disability, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Mental Retardation.

2. Polio affected candidates and those in case of hand injury may be provided with the facility of amanuensis/scribe.

3. In the case of sudden illness rendering the candidate unable to write the examinations. This illness should be duly certified by a Medical Officer of the rank not lower than an Assistant Surgeon of Government/ Municipal Hospital/Dispensary.

4. In case of accident involving injury rendering the candidate unable to write, the nature of accident and the inability of the candidate to write should be duly certified by a Medical Officer of the rank not lower than an Assistant Surgeon of Government/Municipal Hospital or Dispensary.

Eligibility for Amanuensis

1. The amanuensis should be a student of a class lower than that of the candidate with disability appearing at the examination.

2. The amanuensis should not be related to the examinee.

3. The Centre Supdt. will ensure the above at i) & ii) and obtain a certificate to this effect.

4. The Centre Superintendent of the Examination Centre shall keep a list of suitable amanuensis from the school, as far as possible forward the same immediately to the Regional Head of the region and submit a report giving full particulars of the candidates and of the amanuensis for consideration & approval.

5. Service of Amanuensis can be availed for theory as well as in practical where writing is involved and not for the practical work.

 

Fee for Amanuensis

A fee of Rs. 50/- per session of examination will be given to the amanuensis by the Superintendent of the Examination Centre.

Disability-wise Relaxations

a) Locomotor/Orthopedic Disabilities:

Candidates with Locomotor/Orthopedic Disabilities are to be considered as any non-disabled candidate and they will not require any special provision during the Examination.

Polio affected candidates and those in case of hand injury, inability in motor coordination may be provided with the facility of amanuensis/scribe.

b) Visually Impaired Candidates

Visually impaired candidates may be allowed to use amanuensis, or appear at the examination using Brailler Typewriter, or computer. When the student takes examination using Brailler, NIOS will seek the assistance of organizations for the Blind to transcribe the papers into print and the regular examiners will evaluate the papers along with other papers. The student should arrange to bring Brailers, Typewriter, Computer, etc., for examination purpose.

Equipment such as talking calculator, abacus, Taylor frame and geometry drawing kit may be allowed in the Examination Hall.

Skill based project may be given to the visually impaired candidates as an alternative for practical.

For courses requiring computer skills, the equipment needs to be provided by the Examination Centre for conducting Examination.

c) Hearing Impaired Candidates

Interpreter (sign language person) may be allowed in the Examination Room to help the hearing impaired candidates to understand the instructions.

The norms of payment for the interpreter will be similar to that of a scribe.

One interpreter may be adequate for each examination centre. The Centre Superintendent may take decision regarding appointment of an interpreter.

d) Multiple Disability/Cerebral Palsy

Computers with adapted hardware like trackball instead of mouse, augmentative communication boards may be allowed. Use of Calculator may also be allowed for candidate with Dyscalculia. Candidates will have to arrange for their own tools and equipments.

Adapted chair, table, bed, etc, may be allowed into the Examination room in the case of severely disabled children who need them.

Provision may also be made for reading out the question wherever necessary.

e) Mentally Challenged candidates

Computers with adapted hardware like trackball instead of mouse, augmentative communication boards and calculators may be allowed.

Adapted chair, table, bed may be allowed into Examination Room depending on the needs.

Provision may also be made for reading out the question to the candidate.

The project work may be allowed instead of all practical subjects.

f) Learning Disabled candidates

Relaxation/s will be provided as per the types of impairment and symptoms described in the table given below:

Learning Disability Area of Impact Symptoms Relaxations Required
Reading Disorder
or
Dyslexia
Oral and written language Difficulty in listening, speaking, reading and writing; Reads letters or words transposed; omits letters or words when reading Reader/scribe, Extended time, Computer
Mathematics Disorder or Dyscalculia Math Difficulty performing calculations; Difficulty with numbers; Spatial problem; Difficulty placing number into vertical columns. Calculator, Reader/ Scribe, Computer, Extended Time,
Disorder of Written Expression or Dysgraphia Writing Illegible handwriting; Difficulty writing within a defined space; Letter reversals; Letter transposition; Omission of letters or words; Poor spelling Reader/Scribe, Extended Time, Computer
Motor Disorders or Dyspraxia Body Coordination Problems with muscles control and coordination; Apparent clumsiness. Reader/Scribe, Extended Time, Computer.
Sensory/ processing/ ADHD/ ADD Perception, Auditory & Visuals People with SPD misinterpret everyday sensory information, such as touch, sound and movement. They may feel bombarded by information, they may seek out intense sensory experiences, or they may have other symptoms. Separate Room, Calculator, Reader/Scribe, Computer, Extended Time, Break.

 

4. Other Relaxations

1. Extended/Extra Time of 20 minutes per hour will be allotted to the certified candidates with disabilities. In case of need for the frequent break, not more than 10 Min. of break after every one hour may be given.

2. Candidates with poor hand function/motor coordination and having speech disorders will have scribes/writer/amanuensis who can understand them (scribe should be other than the subject teacher, parents, siblings)

3. Candidates having minimum hand functioning/ motor coordination with speech disorders will be allowed to use the computer for the examination.

4. Wheel chair user and candidates using additional aids and appliances will be given facilities to write the examination in the ground floor, especially where there are no lift or ramp facilities are available.

5. Candidates with special needs, registered under the SAIED will have the same examination centre with disable friendly infrastructure/barrier free environment and concern professionals can help them in case of need. During examination the invigilators deputed by NIOS will monitor the proceeding of examination.

6. If any a candidate with disability is not covered above and they approach the Centre Superintendent for any relaxation, the case may be referred to the concern Regional Director, and Director (Evaluation), NIOS, New Delhi,

For Teachers

 

Frequently Asked Questions

#1. What does special education mean?
For the sake of clarity, we will call it Management of children with special needs. This includes education as well as any other related therapy, like occupational therapy, speech & language therapy and/or sensory integration therapy. Management has 2 aspects – intervention and accommodation. Intervention is when professionals work towards improving a deficit skill in a child. For e.g., a child has reading difficulties and the trained special educator works on his/her phonological awareness. Accommodation is when the deficit is bypassed or ‘ignored’ in a classroom set up. In the same e.g. above the spelling errors of the child are ignored by the teacher and the content is focused upon.

#2. Special education doesn’t include finishing incomplete classwork, right?
The focus of special education is always to bridge the gap between actual performance and expected performance. If the special educator does only completing the incomplete work then the gap remains as it or widens further. For incomplete work there are other accommodations a teacher can adopt, like, the buddy system to write for the child, photocopying the notes or sending books home to be completed.

#3. Being a teacher i have to look after the whole class and not just one child in my class. Why should other children ‘suffer’?
As a class / subject teacher you are not expected to do special education with the child. For the most important reason that you are not a trained special educator (unless you have had training). However, all teachers are expected to be sensitive to the learning needs of all children in the class. A smile, a pat and a few motivating words of praise can go a long way in giving the special child a sense of belonging to the class. As a general education teacher you are expected to accommodate a child with extra time, less workload, modified curriculum and so on. Even CBSE / ICSE (and other education boards) allow it.

#4. My school doesn’t allow accommodations to be given. What can i do?
All schools since the Right to Education Act 2010 are expected to cater to the needs of all children. All schools are expected to be inclusive. In case it refuses the parent can take the school to court and/or complain to CBSE which might result in compromising the CBSE accreditation of the school.

#5. Can i, as a regular teacher, become a special educator?
Yes, there are courses available for professional development which will ‘make’ you a special educator. Thereafter it’s for you to decide whether you want to work as a general education teacher or a special educator.

#6. If i do a course in special education can i take tuitions?
For the sake of clarity, please understand that special education is not tuition. You can take tuitions even as a regular education teacher but to take remedial intervention classes you need to be a special educator. Once trained you can take remedial sessions in school or even outside school.

How can Orkids help?
– Does your student require Assessment?
– Do you want to upgrade your professional skills?
– Do you want to refer a student for remedial education?

Read a Testimonial about a Parent turned Special Educator

For Corporates

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Current programs

Orkids On Wheels (OOW) are moving environments [Mobile resource centres] which aim to reach out to children in schools for the underprivileged, who are facing difficulties in learning skills so as to cut away the glaring limitations of formal infrastructure, resource material and at times the resource personnel, not to mention the barriers of accessibility, funding, scarcity of professionals and time.

Research oriented initiative is a collaborative research project at HGSE Harvard Graduate School of Education, USA. Orkids’ founder President Dr. Geet Oberoi, a Visiting Scholar at Harvard, is currently doing a collaborative research with Dr Catherine Snow, Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Education at HGSE. It is a 6 month project being executed under the banner of Orkids OutReach Program, under Orkids Foundation. The research is on language acquisition and is geared to highlight the importance of native language in learning the 2nd language (Hindi and English). This is a first of its kind not only in India but also at Harvard. This research aims to give native language the much-needed documented proof of how the teaching of native language facilitates learning of English. A much needed realization especially for our schools working at grass root levels.

Free Assessments wherein children who require psycho educational assessments and counseling will receive free services of trained psychologists. It is to facilitate clearer understanding of the students and their diverse needs by the teachers and the parents and reinforcing a combined effort to work with the students.

Sponsorships for meritorious Teacher trainees from EWS categories as well as rebates in remedial education to children from marginalised strata of society

Orkids is the pioneer organization working in the field of Learning Disabilities and covering both assessment and remedial intervention of children and professional development for educators. It started with one teacher and one child in the year 2000 and has steadily grown over the last 15 years. After thousands of students and hundreds of trained educators and not to mention the difference made to the families of the affected, we would like support to reach out to those who are unable to due to constraints of resources or awareness.

Donate towards our Causes

Current programs: ORKIDS ON WHEELS (OOW) (provide link) FREE ASSESSMENT CAMP (provide link) A Free Module of 4 Workshops (provide link) ORKIDS’ RESEARCH INITIATIVE (make and provide link) SPONSORSHIP FOR PROFESSIONAL (make and provide link) DEVELOPMENT /REMEDIAL INTERVENTION AT DISCOUNT (provide link) DONATE NOW (provide link – causes) SPONSOR A SPECIAL CHILD (make and provide link) Financial help – Yearly remedial of a child – Rs. 4000 Half yearly – Rs. 2000 PARTNER FOR A SCHOOL (discuss, make and provide link) PARTNER FOR AN INSTITUTE (discuss, make and provide link) PARTNER FOR MOBILE REMIDIAL CENTRE (discuss, make and provide link)